02 May 2016

Rough Hedges


Random Thought


While painting some terrain this evening, it struck me that I'm really getting some work done on the gaming table I've always wanted. Maybe not my ideal. I'd love to have one at least 5' x 8' (mine is 4' x 6'-8"), more elaborate terrain, buildings to create a table-wide village, 3D modular tiles with clear resin water, etc. But I've got a lot of work into a pretty respectable, slightly oldschool, workhorse of a gaming table.

Now if I can just get some gaming done on it!

I am working on that.

Rough Hedges


Long ago I made some neat, cliche hedges using dish scrubbing pads mounted on bases.



But I wanted something a little less manicured. After making a few test pieces last week, I cranked out a small batch of hedges in the little in-between moments of the past few days. Three minutes here, five minutes there. So here's my first round of rough hedges, or at least linear foliage for village, roadside, and riverside.



To make them I cut strips of washable air filter (see below), and then further trimmed those into various lengths and irregular shapes. I spray painted them with a couple coats of dark olive green paint, then, when dry, I brushed a couple shades of lighter green on top of that. Done!

Not the best I've seen, but cheap, quick, and they look good enough for my purposes. In fact, I'm thinking about making another batch about that same size.





4 comments:

  1. I much prefer the rough hedges. Looks great and a very versatile bit of scenery. You could also use rubberised horsehair or loofah as a base material.

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    Replies
    1. I'm not familiar with the rubberized horsehair, so when I just looked it up on Google, most of what came up was wargaming links & photos! :) I dug through and found the sources, though. Loofah will be easier to pick up at a local store. I may give one or both a try when I get a chance. Thanks!

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  2. In this case, these techniques are cliched because they work! Natural, rough hedges might look good sprayed gray-brown first and then over-painted with green, might be worth a try for variation.

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    Replies
    1. Good idea. I will try spraying brown on the next batch. Thanks!

      I hope my use of "cliche" didn't sound negative. I just meant that it was a standard piece of terrain & technique.

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